Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Stand.

When you make a traffic stop, after the initial approach to the driver, where do you go? I usually move to the rear, passenger side of my patrol car. Passenger side front door open. When I am alone, I write the ticket on the roof of my car, I am tall enough to do that. If not, I would use the car door frame. I want to be able to see the violators vehicle while writing. I keep the driver in the car. Since I usually work with a partner, he uses the trunk lid to write the citation, and I stand a step back from the patrol car so I can see the suspect vehicle.

I don't like to sit in the patrol car because I want the freedom to move quickly if something happens. I don't let the driver get out of the car unless I want to do a cursory search of them or search their car. I never let the other driver get into my car, unless I have at least detained them and searched them and usually not unless I have arrested and handcuffed them.

I don't stand on the driver side of my car because I don't want to get run over. I don't stand near the hood of my car because it puts me too close to the violators' vehicle. I don't stand at the back of my car because if someone crashes into the back of my vehicle I don't want to be crushed. Stand where it is safe, that's what the SGT Says.

4 comments:

Protect_and_Serve said...

All great points, as usual.

Bunkermeister said...

Thank you.

APOA Voice said...

The only time I will use any of the unit to write on is with a partner and rarely then... I try and position myself away from the unit with a tree, pole etc for cover if needed. I am also a believer in keeping my rotators on as an added distraction.

Big advocate of a right side approach as well, having worked a fair number of years on a bike.

Stay safe out there!!!

Bunkermeister said...

APOA Voice, good advice that. I keep the rotaters on for as long as the stop continues. In an urban environment I don't aways like being away from the car, too many people try and get between me and the vehicle.

Love the right side approach.