Sunday, August 23, 2009

Gather Information

Gathering information is something we do all the time. Two of the best ways are to copy information directly from official documents, or have people write it down for you. When I am collecting data, I try and get their state issued driver license from the person I am talking to, even if it is not a traffic offense. I then copy down all the information I can get off the license. Even the driver license number can be important if you need to find the person again, people with similar names may be difficult to sort out.

If the person has no documents on them, I have them write down their information for me. Giving false information to a peace officer is a crime in California. If I have a document in the suspects own handwriting that says they have given me a false name and date of birth, that's pretty good evidence of that crime. Sometimes I actually give them a Field Interview Card and have them fill it out. This way they will spell the names correctly it eliminates any misunderstandings. Later I will transfer the information to a fresh card in my handwriting and add the police information.

Once I collect the information that I need, I then go over it a second time with the person there, so that I can make sure it is correct. Misunderstandings do happen and even those who want you to have the correct information will sometimes misunderstand questions or I may hear their response improperly. Gathering accurate information is basic police work; that's what the SGT Says.

8 comments:

Texas Ghostrider said...

You are right on the mark. Having them write down their info is really good in a false name charge.

Protect_and_Serve said...

Here in Alabama, giving a false name (sayiing it)is a Misd but providing a false ID (showing it)is a Felony.

*Goddess* said...

I have a traffic question that my gf and I argue about all the time.

If you have an arrow for a right turn, can you still make a right turn on red?

I thought as long as there's no sign prohibiting right turn, you can make the turn and she says you have to wait for a green arrow. I got behind a line of folks that waited tonight, so I'm wondering now if she's right.

Bunkermeister said...

In California a green arrow is like a green light. So if you have a red light to go straight and a green arrow to turn right, then you may legally turn right in the right lane. In fact, if you are in the right lane, you must turn right on the green arrow. Otherwise you are blocking traffic, just like somone sitting through a regular green light.

Your state laws may vary.

*Goddess* said...

I was questioning whether or not you can turn right on a RED arrow. Or do I have to wait for the green arrow? I thought a right turn on red was acceptable anywhere unless otherwise stated.

Bunkermeister said...

A red arrow is like a red light. After coming to a full and complete stop you may proceed to turn right if it is safe to do so.

Again, different states may be different.

Messy Girl said...

Last night there was a wreck right outside my house. I went out to see and the police officers told me to go home. I told them I lived on the property, and they asked to see my ID. But since I'm a college student and I move every few months, my ID has an old address. I just moved into this house two weeks ago, and have not updated my license yet. Even though I clearly had the keys to all the gates in the house, they told me they'd give me a ticket just for looking out at the accident from inside my gated yard. I understand they might have been annoyed that I was looking on, but they can't legally do that, can they?

Bunkermeister said...

Not in California, but your local laws may vary. Interference with an officer in the performance of his duties is a crime, but usually it has to do with more active participation than just watching.