Friday, May 27, 2011

Viva Las Vegas

When I first started working as a cop there was a prank that officers used to play. They would drive the patrol car from Los Angeles to Las Vegas, and take a photograph of themselves and their patrol car in front of the Las Vegas sign. This is a round trip of about 500 miles. In the course of an eight hour shift a police car could just about make it if you drove as fast as you can.



Recently, three officers were fired for driving to Las Vegas during a shift. While at first glance this many seem pretty harsh for a harmless prank, but lets examine it further. In an eight hour shift the officers would have had to average nearly seventy miles per hour. That’s very fast and that means they probably had to drive much faster than that for much of the distance. Presumably they have roll call, they have to check out equipment, make sure their buddies are going to cover their calls and finally get back before shift change. That means they almost certainly drove with red lights and sirens on and probably drove over a hundred miles an hour for at least part of the trip, very dangerous.



It also means that they used a city vehicle, and city fuel and city tires to drive over 500 miles to no department related purpose. It also means they were being paid to goof off rather than do their work, thus defrauding their employer. They also left more work for their partners and would not have been there if a major incident happened. Also if they crashed or got involved in a major incident hundreds of miles outside the city, it would have been an embarrassment to their agency. They deserved major discipline for this foolish act; that’s what the SGT Says.

2 comments:

Protect_and_Serve said...

Those pranks went out with thte era of going on patrol with two cans of spray paint, one black and one white to repair any fender bender accidents before turing the car back in.

Bunkermeister said...

Much has changed in law enforcement some for the better. Those are some of the things that never should have been.