Wednesday, July 27, 2011

University Cop Fired for Helping Other Officers



http://policelink.monster.com/news/articles/155192-cop-fired-for-responding-to-officer-down-call?utm_source=nlet&utm_content=pl_c1_20110608_fired







A university has its own police department and sometimes they assist the local police department; just as the locals often assist the university police. I have always believed that one of the most important things officers can do is help each other. Help your own agency, help neighboring agencies, help on duty and help off duty.





In this instance a university officer responded to an officer needs assistance call from the local city agency. He left the school and assisted a neighbor agency in a legitimate agency. Once the incident was over, he returned to the school. The problem is that he forgot or neglected to notify his own dispatch of his actions. The officer was then fired by his agency.





Certainly the officer deserves disciplinary action. Even if the officer has previous disciplinary actions, I don’t know if he does or not, he does not deserve to be fired. Officers need to keep their dispatch and chain of command informed about their location and activities. By leaving your beat and not notifying anyone you leave your own agency and your own partners at a disadvantage. Supervisors need to know where their officers are and what they are doing. By firing this officer the agency sends a message that they don’t care about helping their brother agency, its bad public relations. It’s a bad example and it will cause resentment with the rank and file in both the university cops and the local police. If I was the chief of the local agency, I would offer him a job, that’s what the SGT Says.

2 comments:

Bob G. said...

Sarge:
YOu NAILED this one when you say the school doesn't care about fellow agencies.
And that allows the wrong people to get the wrong idea...real fast.

Good call.

Stay safe

Bunkermeister said...

School police can be very difficult, they often just want janitors to hold the keys, until the active shooter shows up.